Claire Hansen

painting heroes

Green & Bryksenkova

painting heroesClaire Hansen
'Fire Flies' by Rebecca Green

'Fire Flies' by Rebecca Green

I have been actively seeking to emulate my aesthetic heroes working to expand their awesomeness to both include and assimilate my paintings.

Two of my most favourite painters in the world are Rebecca Green and Yelena Bryksenova.

My painting the Night Twins is very much based on themes of animal rescue and connection that run through Green's paintings. I even replicated her beautiful feathery trees you can see above in "Fire Flies".  I admire Green's work so much because she paints such a wide variety of subjects and her colour work blows me away. I am colour blind, and so cognitively understand all images and subject matter in grey scale and absolutely struggle to achieve sophisticated colour work. Sadly, I rely heavily on my paint's tube labels!

I am comforted that Green admits to recolouring her paints over and over until she is perfectly happy, and that too much planning and pre-painting ( to determine colour and composition) often serves to take the fun out the creating. I agree! Too much planning, for me, often serves to kill the painting dead in the water and they end up perfectly planned never finished wannabes.

My painting Nancy's Book is inspired by 1940s Scottish country living, and stylistically draws heaps from Bryksenova's private lives series. Private moments of comfort, introversion, grief run throughout Bryksenova's paintings. I have studied her work intently and I love Bryksenkova's miniature decorative patterns, and folk art motifs that help to create a sense of place and space in her works. Bryksenova's paintings are exquisite little windows into peoples private moments. And of course, her colour work is exceptional and the perfection of the image below  *sighs*... so good!

Yelena Bryksenkova - private lives series

Yelena Bryksenkova - private lives series

 

You can buy Bryksenkova's prints here, and one day (hopefully) Rebecca Green will sell hers from here. 

Aurora

painting heroesClaire Hansen
Aurora by Mark Ryden 2015

Aurora by Mark Ryden 2015

My current obsession is the great masterpiece Aurora by the painter Mark Ryden.  Mark Ryden is one of the the great painters of classical idealism, his meticulous and painstaking patience layering glaze after glaze of oil paint  results in a painting sometimes taking over a year to complete. 

Note the meticulously painted grains of sand - a miracle of patience and technique

Note the meticulously painted grains of sand - a miracle of patience and technique

Ryden’s mastery of technique, subject and composition reminds me that there are no short cuts to a masterpiece. It is always the result of time, intelligent efforts and patience. When I look at Aurora and truly start to comprehend how beautiful she is it is clear to me that every other work Ryden has painted led to this one and it was a pathway to perfection. 

For me Aurora is most obviously a Goddess painting, a representation of the feminine divine. She represents a type of perfection of being and is brought forth by a perfection of execution and technique and through the aesthetics of neo-classical idealism. She crosses dimensions, the imagery of the water suggesting light and dark, the conscious and unconscious put also the past and the future.  Aurora has a sublime serenity and sensitivity in her expression and to me feels not static, but gentle. Everything that surrounds her, in all its microscopic detail is an expression of the beauty of nature and being and invites us to slow to her vibration and to really experience that in truth, all is perfection. 

Aurora in her frame which has been designed and painted by Mark Ryden, hand carved in Indonesia by master artisans the painting size is 112 x 58 inches; 284.48 x 147.32 cm but reaches to 340cm in her frame.

Aurora in her frame which has been designed and painted by Mark Ryden, hand carved in Indonesia by master artisans the painting size is 112 x 58 inches; 284.48 x 147.32 cm but reaches to 340cm in her frame.

I have trawled the internet to discover who bought Aurora. She has been purchased by a private collector, unnamed, and the price is speculated to be approximately two million dollars.  The painting is priceless, making any selling price a bargain. I wish that the USA had the same level of commitment to public art galleries as in Europe, because I would far prefer this painting to live in a public gallery, fawned over by careful curators and visited daily by loving fans. Aurora should be available to the world, so that I can travel to visit her just like a person might choose to visit Paris